About

Projects

Learn about Projects for American Municipal Power, Inc. Investor Relations, including Smithland Hydro Plant, Meldahl Hydro Plant, and Cannelton Hydro Plant.

Smithland Hydro Plant

The Smithland Hydroelectric Project is a 76 MW run-of-the-river hydroelectric power plant providing renewable generation to the region. The plant is located near Smithland, Kentucky.

The Smithland Project diverts water from the existing U.S. Army Corps Smithland Locks and Dam through bulb turbines anticipated to generate an average annual output of approximately 379 million kilowatt-hours (kWh). The site includes an intake approach channel, a reinforced concrete powerhouse and a tailrace channel. The powerhouse houses three horizontal bulb-type turbine and generating units with an estimated total rated capacity of 76 MW. A 2-mile-long 161 kV transmission line interconnection connects the plant to MISO.

Smithland is located approximately 62 river miles upstream of the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, in Livingston County, Ky. The Smithland hydroelectric plant is on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River, on the opposite shore of the locks.

The plant reached full commercial operation in September, 2017.

Meldahl Hydro Plant

The Meldahl Hydroelectric Project is a 105 MW run-of-the-river hydroelectric power plant providing renewable generation to the region. The facility is the largest hydroelectric power plant on the Ohio River.

The Meldahl Project diverts water from the existing U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Meldahl Locks and Dam through bulb turbines anticipated to generate an average annual output of approximately 558 million kilowatt-hours (kWh). The site includes an intake approach channel, a reinforced concrete powerhouse and a tailrace channel. The powerhouse contains three horizontal bulb-type turbine and generating units with a total rated capacity of 105 MW.

The Captain Anthony Meldahl Locks and Dam are located near Maysville, Kentucky, approximately an hour southeast of Cincinnati. The Meldahl hydroelectric plant is on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River, on the opposite shore of the locks.

The plant reached full commercial operation in April 2016.

Cannelton Hydro Plant

The Cannelton Hydroelectric Project is an 88 MW run-of-the-river hydroelectric power plant providing renewable generation to the region. The facility is located on the Ohio River near Hawesville, Kentucky.

The Cannelton Project diverts water from the existing U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cannelton Locks and Dam through bulb turbines anticipated to generate an average annual output of approximately 458 million kilowatt-hours (kWh). The site includes an intake approach channel, a reinforced concrete powerhouse and a tailrace channel. The powerhouse contains three horizontal bulb-type turbine and generating units with a total rated capacity of 88 MW.

The Cannelton Locks and Dam are located near Hawesville, Kentucky. The Cannelton hydroelectric plant is on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River, on the opposite shore of the locks.

The plant reached full commercial operation in June 2016.

Greenup Hydro Facility

The Greenup Hydroelectric Facility is a 70.2 MW power plant located near Portsmouth, Ohio. In connection with the development of the Meldahl Project, Hamilton agreed to sell and AMP agreed to purchase a 48.6 percent undivided ownership interest in the Greenup Hydroelectric Facility. Hamilton retains title to a 51.4 percent ownership interest in the Greenup Hydroelectric Facility. Forty-seven AMP member communities are participating in the project.

Willow Island Hydro Plant

The Willow Island Hydroelectric Project is a 44 MW run-of-the-river hydroelectric power plant that provides renewable generation to the region. The facility is located near St. Marys, West Virginia, on the Ohio River.

The Willow Island Project diverts water from the existing U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Willow Island Locks and Dam through bulb turbines anticipated to generate an average annual output of approximately 239 million kilowatt-hours (kWh). The site includes an intake approach channel, a reinforced concrete powerhouse and a tailrace channel. The powerhouse includes two horizontal bulb-type turbine and generating units with an estimated total capacity of 44 MW.

The Willow Island Locks and Dam are located in Pleasants County, West Virginia, approximately 162 river miles downstream of Point Bridge, Pittsburgh. The Willow Island hydroelectric plant is on the West Virginia side of the Ohio River, on the opposite shore of the locks.

The plant reached full commercial operational in February 2016.

AMP Fremont Energy Center

The AMP Fremont Energy Center (AFEC) is a 675 MW natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) facility in Fremont, Ohio. As an intermediate power source, AFEC has a capacity of 512 MW (unfired) and includes duct-firing that allows an additional 163 MW of generation during peak demand periods. AFEC consists of two combustion turbines, two heat recovery steam generators and one steam turbine and condenser.

AMP purchased the facility in July 2011 from FirstEnergy Generation Corp., a subsidiary of Akron-based FirstEnergy Corp. (NYSE: FE).

AMP owns 90.69 percent of AFEC on behalf of 86 participating AMP member utilities in seven states and 4.15 percent on behalf of the Central Virginia Electric Cooperative. The Michigan Public Power Agency owns the remaining 5.16 percent.

The plant reached full commercial operation in January 2012.

Prairie State

The Prairie State Energy Campus is a two-unit, supercritical coal-fired power plant designed to have a net rated capacity of approximately 1,582 MW and associated facilities in southwest Illinois. AMP is the largest equity owner of the facility at 23.26 percent, which translates to 368 MW. The remainder of the ownership group is comprised of power entities with a similar mission to AMP. Sixty-eight AMP member communities participate in the project. 

The plant reached full commercial operation in 2012.

Belleville Hydroelectric Plant (OMEGA JV5)

The Belleville Hydroelectric Plant is a 42 MW run-of-the-river hydroelectric power plant providing renewable generation to the region.

The Belleville plant diverts water from the existing U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Belleville Locks and Dam. Besides the 42 MW Belleville Hydroelectric Plant, the joint venture consists of approximately 26.5 miles of 138-kilovolt transmission facilities and fifteen 1.8 MW diesel reciprocating generating units. In May 2016, the 15 diesel units were restricted to emergency use only generation. During 2017, the participants approved selling the diesel assets, and sale and decommissioning is currently in progress.

The Belleville Locks and Dam are located near Belleville, West Virginia, southwest of Marietta, Ohio. The Belleville Hydroelectric Plant is on the West Virginia side of the Ohio River, on the opposite shore of the locks.

The plant reached full commercial operation in 1999.

Solar Phase II

In March 2016, AMP entered into a joint development agreement with DG AMP Solar, a wholly owned subsidiary of NextEra Energy Resources, for the development, construction and operation of up to 80 megawatts (MW) or more of new solar electric generation facilities. The two organizations executed a solar power purchase agreement (PPA).

Through the DG AMP Solar subsidiary, NextEra builds, owns and operates the solar sites and AMP purchases all output from the solar generation. AMP sells the output to 22 participating members using a take and pay contract.

The systems each consist of solar photovoltaic generating facilities utilizing polycrystalline photovoltaic modules and central inverters. The modules are mounted on either a fixed tilt or tracker racking system. Each system is interconnected to the electric distribution system of a host participant and is located at a site located on land within or near the geographic footprint of such host participant.  

The initial systems consist of 13 systems with a rated capacity of approximately 36.825 MW located in Delaware, Michigan, Ohio and Virginia.  The initial systems have a rated capacity ranging from 0.25 MW to 20 MW.  The first of the initial systems, located in Bowling Green, entered commercial operation in January 2017.